Military Forcing Some Officers to Retire with Enlisted Pay

Rules for Retiring as an Officer
The normal rules require military members to serve 10 years as an officer to be able to retire as an officer. However, due to Force Shaping, there is currently an exception written into Title 10 of the US Code (the law that governs military pay and benefits), that allows service members with only 8 years of service as an officer to retire as an officer. Here are the applicable laws (note: these showcase the Army laws, as this is affecting more Army members than other services; the laws for the other services are similar):

Title 10 U.S. Code section 1370: “a commissioned officer […] will “be retired in the highest grade in which he served on active duty satisfactorily, as determined by the Secretary of the military department concerned, for not less than six months.”

Title 10 U.S. Code section 3911: “the Secretary of the Army may, upon the officer’s request, retire a regular or reserve commissioned officer of the Army who has at least 20 years of service computed under section 3926 of this title, at least 10 years of which have been active service as a commissioned officer.”

Title 10 U.S. Code section 3911: “The Secretary of Defense may authorize the Secretary of the Army, during the period specified in paragraph (2), to reduce the requirement under subsection (a) for at least 10 years of active service as a commissioned officer to a period (determined by the Secretary of the Army) of not less than eight years.”

But there are many officers being let go just shy of the required 8 years. In some cases, officers are allowed to get a waiver to extend their service up to 60 days or so to reach the required service time. But others aren’t so lucky, and are being forced from the service just short of reaching the requirement time served to retire as an officer. In fact, some of them are just months shy of reaching the required 8 years.

And the difference is huge.

 
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